InD'Ear: Audiobooks: Conflict Resolution: Author vs Narrator

Ann M.
Richardson

I gratefully held the author’s payment in my hands and reflected on the most difficult and, at times, the most unpleasant narration project I’d ever completed. I shouldn’t have been surprised. There had been several red flags waving at me along each step of the production process of this particular audiobook, but being ever the optimist—plus feeling very confident in my narration skills—and taking into consideration that I’ve been writing this column for more than two years with the mission of helping authors navigate the audiobook production process, I doggedly persisted.I sincerely believed I could do a great job and help the author learn the ropes so that the next time an audiobook was in his plans, he’d have a better understanding of how it should go.

Read the entire article in the March 2017 issue of InD'Tale magazine.

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Comments

I have three audio versions of one of my favorite books. And while the words are identical, the interpretations given by the three readers are significantly different and thus give different emphasis, and sometimes meanings, to the same chapters. So listening to audio books is not the same as reading them, you have an element of interpretation by the reader from certain customwritingcompany that is not present in the written version.